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Dallas Lunch: Applied Behavioral Finance with Raife Giovinazzo
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9/21/2017
When: Thursday, September 21, 2017
11:30 am - 1:00 pm
Where: Hilton Dallas - Park Cities
5954 Luther Lane
Suite 1700
Dallas 75225
Contact: CFA/DFW
214-363-3284

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Applied Behavioral Finance

Program description: Behavioral finance combines psychology and finance – contending that preconceptions and cognitive errors lead investors to misinterpret events and overlook opportunities. While behavioral finance is relatively new to most investors, its basic premise is not. In fact, fundamentals of behavioral finance are as old as mankind itself. The dynamics of human nature – the ingrained switches that trigger powerful emotions of love, hate, greed, courage, fear – are largely unchanged; only the settings in which we play them out are different.

Complimentary for all


Sponsored by: 

The Luther King Capital Management Center for Financial Studies,
Neeley School of Business, Texas Christian University

 


 

Speaker bio: Raife Giovinazzo is a partner and director of research at Fuller & Thaler in San Mateo, California. He also co-manages the firm’s research-driven U.S. Large-Cap Behavioral Advantage strategy. He has more than 10 years of financial industry experience. Previously, he was a researcher and co-portfolio manager with Blackrock's Scientific Active Equity group (formerly Barclays Global Investors). His previous experience also includes investment and consulting work with Wellington Management, Marsh & McLennan, and Mercer Management Consulting (now Oliver Wyman). Mr. Giovinazzo earned a BA in sociology from Princeton University, and an MBA in analytic finance, economics, and statistics and a PhD in finance, both from The University of Chicago Booth School of Business. He wrote his undergraduate thesis for Daniel Kahneman, PhD, while at Princeton; Richard Thaler, PhD, was his dissertation co-chair at The University of Chicago.